A new logo for Allcanuck

The Allcanuck club (which is now in its fifth year) proudly unveils a new logo:

The new logo typifies our Danish-Canadian connections:

  • red and white (the colours of both countries’ flags)
  • our members’ love of group activities, sports and fun
  • what could better symbolize Canadians and Danes than a helmet / baseball cap decorated with Viking horns?

The logo was designed by Costin Găman, a multimedia designer who focuses on converting esoteric and vague ideas into simple, powerful graphics. He moved from Bucharest, Romania to Aalborg, Denmark where he is studying multimedia design (logos, 3D graphics, web sites) at Northern Jutland University College. Costin is a student of Andy Rutter, Allcanuck’s webmaster. Costin enjoyed working with the Allcanuck executive –- he says many clients expect him to use his “telepathic mutant superpowers” to read their minds to figure out what they want.

Costin thinks of another clever logo.

We hope you will like our new logo, and if you need any creative and demanding design work done, discuss it with Costin – you can reach him through the “Contact” form on our web site.

Be sure to keep your permits up to date

A reminder for those of you living in Denmark on visas or limited-time permission to be in the country: Be sure you know when your permit to stay in Denmark expires, and get it sorted out beforehand. The Allcanuck club has witnessed two recent cases in which Canadians married to Danes discovered to their horror that their “permission to stay in Denmark” stamps in their passports had been left to expire. In both cases, extensions were later granted, but not without much heart-rending worry, panic and tears. The two cases mentioned both involved Canadians busy with marriage, children, employment plus learning Danish, so the permits got overlooked. Don’t let it happen to you!

Information about Danish old-age pensions

I’d been under the impression that my monthly 8% pension deduction was money thrown away, but not so! I’ve found some information about Danish pensions and how they’re paid to expats who subsequently move abroad. See:

Booklet on Danish pensions abroad

The site contains an 18-page booklet on the Danish pension system, how to collect a Danish pension abroad, the co-ordinating rules in Europe, agreements with other countries, and addresses of pension authorities abroad.

Did you know? If you work in Denmark for at least 3 years, you can collect a reduced pension starting from the day you retire. It can be paid to you in the EU or Canada, depending on where you retire. The amount of pension payments will differ depending on where you retire, if you’re married, etc.

Canadian taxes and Danish income??

Hi, I’m looking for some advice regarding filing my Canadian income tax return.

I moved here in March 2010 and have been working for a Danish company with no ties to Canada since then.  I still have residential ties left in Canada (apartment that I rent out so there is some Canadian income that I will declare, bank accounts, drivers license, etc.).  I’ve read through the resident statuses on the government site, but it’s still a bit confusing to me and I’m hoping to get a layman’s explanation of this.

Because of my residential ties, I am guessing I am considered a Resident still.  I did read about Deemed Non-Resident, but I’m unsure if I fall under that at all.  What I’d like to know is, if I am a Resident, how do I actually file my taxes?  Do I declare my Danish income?  I read one discussion where someone was working in the UK and declared their UK income, but still ended up paying additional taxes to Canada (possibly because the tax bracket he was in while working in the UK was lower than what he would have been had he made the same amount in Canada).  It also doesn’t really make sense to me why I would even need to declare my Danish income since it has nothing to do with Canada.

That’s the gist of my situation, if anyone has any information it would be really helpful.

International schools in Denmark

The Danish government has been working on increasing the number of schools that offer education in English, for the benefit of expat children. Here is a partial list of schools that offer lessons in English:

Zealand:

  • Bjørns Internationale Skole, Copenhagen
  • Østerbro International School, Copenhagen
  • Institut Sankt Joseph, Copenhagen
  • Copenhagen International School, Hellerup
  • Rygaards Skole, Hellerup
  • Bernadotteskolen, Hellerup
  • Nordsjællands Grundskole og Symnasium, Hørsholm
  • Køge Private Realskole, Køge
  • Herlufsholm Kostskole, Næstved
  • The International, near Ringkøbing
  • efterskole independent boarding school

Jutland:

  • Skipper Clement Skolen, Aalborg
  • Viborg Private Realskole, Viborg
  • Interskolen, Viby J
  • Ikast-Brande International School, Ikast (www.isib.dk)*
  • Kolding Realskole, Kolding
  • Esbjerg International School, Esbjerg (www.esbjerginternationalschool.dk)
  • Privatskolen Als, Sønderborg
  • The International School of Aarhus

* Ikast-Brande Gymnasium offers the International Baccalaureate program in English. See www.ikast-gym.dk/IB-World-School-204.aspx.

Teknisk Gymnasium Sønderjylland offers the International Baccalaureate diploma program. See www.eucsyd.dk/Vis.aspx?id=30366.

Langkaer Gymnasium in Tilst, near Aarhus offers the International Baccalaureate diploma program. See www2.langkaer.dk/ib/ibworldschool/.

You can read more about the International Baccalaureate at their website, www.ibo.org. For an illustrated guide to education in Denmark, contact The Copenhagen Post newspaper and request their annual Education supplement.

Viking hilarity

Want to learn about the Vikings? As seen from a Muppets perspective?

This YouTube video shows the Muppets singing “In The Navy” while marauding as Viking warriors. A catchy tune, and sure to bring a smile.

Video feature on Canada/US relations

Here’s a nice report to watch if you’re homesick for Canada. American news anchor Tom Brokaw is featured in this lavish 6-minute feature, which was prepared last February prior to the Vancouver Olympics. It’s for an American audience, but explains quite well why the folks in our two countries get along so well. See:

www.wimp.com/explainscanada/

Surveys of expatriates living in Denmark

The results of two surveys of expats living in Denmark have been released recently. See the relevant web sites for details:

1. The 2010 expat survey by Oxford Research and The Copenhagen Post is the third such study. Allcanuck member Derek Light helped design the study and analyze the results, and I think he did a great job! Study results have been summarized in various newspapers. The full 102-page study (a PDF file) is available from Oxford Research.

2. The Worktrotter DK group conducted a smaller survey of expats and released the results this month. Its focus is on how open Danes are (both personally and dealing with government bureaucracy). Dagmar Fink summarized the results in a PDF report available on the WorkTrotter web site.

Piano lessons in Copenhagen

Some information for those of you hoping to expand your musical skills – or if you have eligible children:

Harman Music Methods

Piano courses for kids and adults; classical, popular and jazz. For absolute beginners, intermediates or advanced. Courses include rhythm, reading notes and music theory. All courses feature individual tuition.
Location: Central Copenhagen
Prices range from 185kr to 210kr per hour.
Website: www.jhmms.org

Finding and meeting Danes

A new initiative sponsored by the Danish Ministry of Integration is aimed at linking up expats with compatible Danish people. The program is run by 6 associations, including Expat in Denmark, New to Denmark, Work in Denmark, Nydansker, WelcomeTo, and Copenhagen Kommune.

To get started, navigate to www.letsmeetin.dk. Create a profile and start searching for Danish or other expatriate people or families who have similar interests to your own.

Post a comment if you have any good or less than satisfactory experiences with the initiative.

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